Good things come to those who wait – and a lot of people had been waiting! Tuesday marked the beginning of what was to be the wettest period in about 9 months, so I jumped at the opportunity to see what amphibian life had taken opportunity of the 70mm downpour.

A friend of mine; David, kindly agreed to go frogging on very short notice, so we headed to Roy’s Rd, near the scientific area reserve. I haven’t seen a new species in over a year so hoped I might have out there. Despite hearing and seeing several frog species, none of which were new to me.

Graceful treefrog (Litoria gracilenta) displaying characteristic purple colouring behind legs

Graceful treefrog (Litoria gracilenta) displaying characteristic purple colouring behind legs

I was however very pleased to have snapped some much better photos of the Copper-backed broodfrog (Pseudophryne raveni), of which I haven’t found often before.

Copper-backed broodfrog (Pseudophryne raveni). A very difficult species to find hidden amongst decaying leaf litter.

Copper-backed broodfrog (Pseudophryne raveni). A very difficult species to find hidden amongst decaying leaf litter.

Copper-backed broodfrog (Pseudophryne raveni). They have a quite monotone copper back.

Copper-backed broodfrog (Pseudophryne raveni). They have a quite monotone copper back.

Wallum froglet (Crinia tinnula), a threatened species

Wallum froglet (Crinia tinnula), a threatened species

Belly shot of the wallum froglet (Crinia tinnula). Crinia species can be very difficult to distinguish, so often the only way to tell are by the patterning/markings on their stomach.

Belly shot of the wallum froglet (Crinia tinnula). Crinia species can be very difficult to distinguish, so often the only way to tell are by the patterning/markings on their stomach.

We found a few other species, the green treefrog (Litoria caerulea) and the striped wallum frog (Litoria freycineti), before heading off home.

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